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Rifles

Remington’s New Woodmaster

by Jon R. Sundra   |  September 23rd, 2010 38

The model 750 is the latest in Remington’s evolution of the modern semiauto hunting rifle.

For a gun design to remain unchanged for a quarter of a century is rather common for a bolt-action centerfire rifle, but not so when we’re talking about a semiauto. Remington’s Model 750 Woodsmaster, introduced last year, represents the first substantial change in the design since its predecessor, the Model 7400, was introduced in 1981. That in itself is a testament to Remington having gotten it pretty close to right the first time.


Actually, the basic design goes back to the Model 740 of 1955 when it replaced the Model 81 that had been in production since 1936. According to Remington historian Bill Marcot, the decision to replace the 81 was made in August of 1944, so why it took an 11-year gestation I haven’t a clue.

The history of Remington’s involvement with self-loading centerfires is an interesting one, as it was the first American manufacturer to introduce such a gun in this country back in 1906. It became known as the Model 8, and, interestingly enough, it was based on a John Browning design for which Remington paid him royalties. The Model 8 utilized the same recoiling barrel system as the one first seen in the storied Browning A-5 shotgun that became affectionately known as the “humpback.”


SPECIFICATIONS
Remington Model 750
MANUFACTURER: Remington Arms Co.
MODEL: Woodmaster
ACTION TYPE: Gas-operated semiautomatic
CALIBER: .243 Win., .308 Win., .270 Win., .30-06, .35 Whelen (tested)
MAGAZINE CAPACITY: 4
BARREL LENGTH: 22 inches, 18 1/2, carbine)
WEIGHT: 7 1/4 pounds, 7 1/2 pounds
STOCK: Satin walnut or synthetic with recoil pad
FINISH: blued
SIGHTS: Adjustable rear, ramp front. Drilled and tapped for scope
PRICE: $732

In conjunction with the Model 8 came the .25, .30, .32 and .35 Remington family of cartridges. The Model 8 was replaced in 1936 by the Model 81, which was little more than a cosmetic redo of the Model 8 and was chambered for the same cartridges except for the .25, which was dropped from the line at that time.

Which brings us back to the Model 740 of 1955, the progenitor of the new Model 750. Designed by L.R. Crittenden and Bill Gail, Jr., the 740 was the sleekest, smallest and lightest semiauto rifle capable of digesting the .30-06 family of cartridges. It remains so to this day. Inside the 740′s streamlined, compact receiver was a multi-lug rotary bolt that locked up with an insert housed in a barrel extension.

Gases bled from the barrel powered the piston that reciprocated twin action bars connected to the bolt. Unlike its predecessors, the 740 utilized a four-round detachable box magazine. The 740 lasted only five years before it was replaced by the 742, but it was essentially the same gun cosmetically updated and with Teflon added to some bearing surfaces.

The first substantive changes to the 740/742 series came in 1982 with the Model Four/7400 series. Despite the two designations, the guns differed only in cosmetics. The major change over the 740 was in the lockup.


The Model 750 Woodsmaster shown here was introduced in 2006, followed in 2007 by the 750 Synthetic.

Whereas the earlier guns used the interrupted thread system, which resulted in 19 individual (and obviously very tiny) locking lugs, the bolt head of the new 7400 sported only four. With fewer locking lugs it’s easier to achieve tighter manufacturing tolerances, which in turn ensures a greater degree of contact between the locking lugs and their abutment surfaces.

To improve reliability, the magazine was changed to feed cartridges at a shallower angle, and the breech was counterbored to a funnel shape to “gather in,” as it were, the noses of misaligned cartridges headed for the chamber.


The gas-operated 750 is much easier on the shoulder than a fixed-breech gun, especially when shooting from the bench.

The extractor was also changed; where once it was secured by a small rivet, it was now held in place by its own spring tension exerted against its annular retaining groove inside the recessed bolt face. (This same change was also made to the extractor of the Model 700 bolt-action rifle.) The Model Four designation used to distinguish the deluxe version of this gun was dropped after a few years; only the Model 7400 name was used, until now.

With the new Model 750 comes the fourth generation of the original Model 740. For testing I chose a caliber that in this gun makes for a very potent short- to medium-range rig perfectly capable of taking on any animal on the continent, the .35 Whelen. Ind
eed, my plan was to use the test gun on an Alberta black bear hunt, for it would be difficult to come up with a more formidable choice for that particular application, but I didn’t receive the gun in time for my hunt.

The Model 750 weighed in at 7 1/2 pounds as it came from the box, and with its 22-inch barrel it measured 42 5/8 inches overall. Distinguishing this gun cosmetically from it forebears is a beavertail-like forearm that’s accentuated by a sharply delineated ridge running its entire length on each side.


Only Remington loads ammo for the .35 Whelen. Two loadings are offered, a 200 and a 250 grain, both Pointed Soft Point Core Lokts.

With the bottom half of the forearm being wider than the upper half, it forms a flute of sorts where the two surfaces meet. The visual effect is quite handsome and lends a distinctive look to the gun. As for the rest of the changes made, they’re all functional, but the only one visible from the outside is the presence of a free-rotating sling swivel stud at the forearm tip, a feature not found on previous models.

Beneath that forearm is an improved gas system that Remington claims is cleaner and more efficient. By moving the gas vent closer to the chamber, there should be less carbon deposits on the piston assembly and bolt velocity should be more consistent.


(Top) The 750′s lineage starts with the Model 740, which was introduced in 1955. (Center) The 742 replaced the 740 in 1960, but the changes were purely cosmetic except for the addition of Teflon to some of the innards. Shown here is the Carbine version. (Bottom) The Model 7400 replaced the 742 in 1984 and incorporated several design changes, the most notable being the locking system. It has been replaced by the Model 750.

Also, all reciprocating surfaces are now coated with Teflon for smoother, quieter operation. All the aforementioned changes are said to translate into more reliable operation, particularly in severe environments.

The 750′s detachable magazine remains the same and is interchangeable with earlier Model 7400 versions. As such, it is unique in that the bolt hold-open feature is built into it. Holding the bolt open after the last shot is the magazine follower, which juts up into the bolt raceway to interfere with the bolt closing.

In this respect it’s like the military Mauser 98. By sliding a latch located near the bottom left side of the magazine forward, the rear of the follower is tilted downward, allowing the bolt to close. The magazine-release latch is also the same as on previous models in that it’s located on the front web of the triggerguard bow on the right side.

To ready the test gun for the range, I mounted a Swarovski 1.5-6×42 scope in a Talley mount. It should be noted here that even with a scope mounted, the 750 has a nice balance and one-hand grasping quality that is unlike that of a bolt-action rifle. Thanks to the rounded contours of the magazine and the slim receiver, one-hand carrying of the 750 at one’s side approaches the feel and balance of a Winchester 94 or Marlin 336, and that’s saying something.


On the new Model 750 the gas bleed orifice has been moved closer to the chamber for cleaner operation and more consistent bolt velocity.

Only Remington loads ammo for the .35 Whelen, and only two are offered: a 200-grain PSP at 2,675 fps and a 250-grain PSP at 2,400. Muzzle energies are 3,177 and 3,197 ft-lbs, respectively; that’s about 250 ft-lbs more in both cases than a 180-grain .30-06. All I had on hand was the 200-grain loading, and to wait the additional seven to 10 days it would have taken to get some 250-grain loads delivered wasn’t in the cards, so I went ahead with just the 200s.

Though it’s generally thought that anything other than a bolt action has no chance of even approaching MOA accuracy, I’ve tested a few other action types that refuted that notion, among them some predecessors of this new Model 750 and its sister model, the slide-action Model 7600. The latter is basically the same rifle, but instead of a gas piston doing the work, the action bars are connected to a movable fore-end for manual operation.

Over the course of firing 60 rounds at the range, the gun functioned without any problems. Accuracy was quite good, averaging 15?8 inches for the best of seven three-shot groups (out of 10 fired) from a cold barrel. That’s from a self-loader that can spit four rounds in the bat of an eye. The trigger was kind of mushy and had noticeable creep, and it broke at just under five pounds, but then that’s the nature of the internal hammer employed in the gun’s modular trigger unit. It really wasn’t all that bad by anything but bolt-action standards.


The unique bolt release is incorporated into the detachable magazine itself. Pushing forward on the button lowers the follower, allowing the bolt to close.

I’ve never been a big fan of autoloaders, but a lot of you out there are, and they just don’t come any better than this Remington 750. Its only real competition is the Benelli R-1 and Browning’s BAR, so with there being only two other guns one might consider, comparing the feel, balance and features among the three guns is relatively easy compared to shopping for a bolt action, of which there are so many. It’s a tough choice because they’re all very good guns.


The fluted fore-end on the 750 is reminiscent of the beavertail style, which gives the gun a distinctive look. It also feels good, says the author.

When introduced last year, the 750 was offered only with a walnut stock as per the Woodsmaster test gun, but for ’07 the 750 Synthetic joins the line, displacing the previous Model 7400, which is no more. Both the wood- and synthetic-stocked 750s are offered in a carbine version with 181?2-inch barrels but are available only in .308 and .30-06. As for the .35 Whelen, it continues to be av
ailable only in the Woodsmaster, but I for one would like to see it offered in the Synthetic as well.

  • jeff bertram

    was told you cannot use open sights with a scope on the 750 woodmaster because remington changed the design of the receiver. even tryed different scope rings so you cant use open sights and still shooting low with the scope turned all the way up. now im looking for some off set ring inserts for the mounts. consumers should be told when purchasing

  • Danny Stanfield

    I have not been able to sight in my 750 woodmaster it is all over the paper. I have changed out the scope and still can not get it in a patten. Any throughts on this?

    • steve-o

      Danny it's hard to say what to do unless we know what's been done and how it was done. At this point I'd start over. Remove the scope and even the base. Look for any odd contact wear or spots rubbed shiny. Replace any piece which looks suspect, bent or twisted. NOW clean it – barrel and action as best you can. Don't get the action soaked where you can't wipe it clean. Make certain everything is clean and dry. Also do this for your optics, rings, bases, everything clean and dry. Now take a box of good old green label Core Lokts in 150gr or 165gr and go to the range. Make sure to place the forearm on a rest. Take your time and start your target close. If it still doesn't print, take it to someone for hands on help before trying to return it.
      Good luck!

    • daveR

      TRy different Ammo/ Worked for me in the past. heavier or lighter bullet, different MFR. ETC…I am sure the gun will find a load it likes.

    • Darryl

      I have had the same problem and I am shipping the gun back to manufacturer because I was told by a tech. that this model has had some that the barrel itself is slanted downward and will shoot low with a scope on it. The iron sights work fine because that is right on the barrel itself, but the scope is mounted on the receiver which is straight. So they need to straighten the barrel out. They gave me the technical terms but basically it is a special screw or bolt they will need to adjust where the barrel meets the receiver etc…. Wasted 40 rounds trying to sight it in and was always maxing out the elevation on my scope. Hopefully this helps. maybe you are having the same problem??? Kind of frustrating that remington lets a gun leave the factory with this problem….

  • JJ

    Have had a 750 carbine 06' since 07 could never get it to hold 0 with scope, sook it off ever since have shot accurately out to 250 yards with factory sights. 1 jam with about 200 rounds.

  • 30/06

    I have owned a 742 woodmaster and love the new 750, i own it in 30/06 and use open sights
    I did change the facotry sights to a better set I got from william gunsite and shoot 200 yards 3" gorups no problem, 100 yars I shoot 1-2 inche groups . the secret to this and all semi autos is to used rounded tip ammo and you will never have it jam. if you use pointed ammo its gonna jam every now and them

  • Ayman

    I bought a new 750 but if anyone can recommend a matching good scope to buy?
    Thanks

    • woody 750

      bye the new redfield revolution scope. i have one on my 750 30-06 carbine. it is a serious tack driver!!!!!

    • j.win

      zeiss 3/9/40mm 399.00, or nikon 3/9/40mm 179.97

    • Noja

      Redfield scope 3×9 works great on my 750 .308

  • frank vandelden

    Can a 750 forearm woodstock fit a 742 for a direct replacement

  • ray

    I bought the 750 over the weekend, broke it down for cleaning including the fore-arm per instructions however cannot get the fore-arm to seat right upon reassembly; it won't fit flush against the receiver by about 1/8th inch.Called Remington support but they didn't have a clue. Any recommendations would be appreciated.

  • Jim

    The forearm on my 750 does not fit tight to the receiver. I think they are all that way.

  • M.W.BROWN

    I have owned a 750since they were released 35whelan no real problems i owned a700 30-6 before that had to change because of a stroke had go to a gun with less recoil the semi auto was the ticket the gun shoots very well i reload my own ammo 180 gr. bullets. I tryed to get the trigger lightened up no one will work on it .remington will only send a trigger to remington shop for replacement.
    can anyone helpout.

    • b. boisvert

      try www,erniethegunsmith.com for a lighter trigger spring. they work great, have one on my 870,7400 and 750

    • matt

      i used a 870/7400/1100/1187 timney trigger fix (lighter spring and new sear pin). worked great and was easy to install. still a little creep but there was creep before the fix:/

  • Bob Estes

    I have a mod.750 very new in cal. 243. It jams almost ev shot. Failure to eject. Cases seize in chamber. Extractor even tears a small pc off the case rim but won't extract. I clean it thoroughly. I have a lemon! I have learned that this is a common failure. Don't buy for looks only! Anyone want to buy?
    Bob Estes
    Jan. 9

    • John

      Hi Bob do you want to sell your gun?
      John email: ajobx2@gmail.com

    • Mark Crawford

      Stick with Remington ammo. I never have a jam with my 750 – except when I use some other brand.

      • Joe Di

        you should not have to use just Rem. amo there something wrong with gun send back to Remingtion.

  • Bob Robertson

    Excellent review, thank you.

    I had the opportunity to handle a synthetic 750 at a gun show last weekend for the first time. I was astounded by how light it felt, and balanced.

    I'm glad to read that the iron sights work, as standard scopes are a bit too restrictive for me. I want to try a holographic or reflective, but if iron sights work then that removes a whole lot of work.

    Now, anyone making a 20 round magazine? :^)

  • eric

    have a remington 750 woodmaster in 270 win synth stock but ive shot like 6 boxs of ammo thru it and can not seem to hit paper with anything ive tried three diff scopes and nothing u can be 30 yards and see dirt fly way right like 2 ft off to right and dirt low ive tried 50 dollar ammo tryed core loks 130 to 150 no luck it will fire one round then fail to shoot the next round u pull the trigger and nothing you eject it and fire the next and so on any ideas bought new

    • BRIAN RACHAL

      LOOK I BOUGT MY WM 750 IN 06 OR 07 NEW. I USE OVER AND UNDER RINGS WITH $80.00 BUSHNELL 3X9X40 AND HAD NO PROBLEMS, I KILLED SEVERAL WHITE TAIL SHOOTING 150 GRAIN WINCHESTER AMMO. THE CORELOCKT AND OTHER BRAND COPPER CASINGS ARE TO SOFT. NOTICE SHAVINGS IN GUN RECIEVER AFTER FIRING. ALSO I CHANGED TO 70.00 CENTER POINT BECAUSE OF ILLUMINATING CROSS HAIRS AND KILLED 4 DEER WITH NO TROUBLE.( BAD EYES AT
      DAY BREAK) MY RINGS ARE WEAVERS. I TRIED CORELOKTS,FEDERAL,AND HORNADY. SAME RESULTS(BRASS CASSING TO SOFT

  • tom

    had to shim the back side of my scoop mount on my 270 finly got a bulls eye now just got to find amo that wont jam every other round . cleaned it and ordered a new magizine. will try the remington bullits, been frustating

    • tom

      found the sping that hold
      s the magazine was not installed proper, shots grate now. good luck to the rest of you

    • BRIAN RACHAL

      ALSO I WENT TO A MODEL 7400 CLIP BECAUSE IT HAS A STRONGER SPRING.MINE GOT WEAK BY LEAVING CLIP LOADED. AND COULD NOT GET 750 CLIP LOCAL SO A FRIEND (GS) SOLD ME 7400 CLIP AND TO ME IT WAS A STRONGER CLIP. WORKED GREAT WITH NO TROUBLE. OH DONT LEAVE CLIP LOADED WHEN NOT IN USE.(BIG NO NO) ALSO KEEP GUN CLEAN AFTER USE. DIRTY GUN EQUALS DIRTY RESULTS.

  • Tom G

    My new 750 in 308 jams every shot with 4 different amos. Also the safety is stuck in the shooting position. Brand new gun,20 rounds and not one worked properly. Even when I only shot one shell the gun failed to stay open. Could'nt be any worse.

    • Guest

      Most likely it is a clip problem. Take it to a dealer that knows Remingtom auto loaders and he'll know what to do.

    • BRIAN RACHAL

      USE WINCHESTER AMMO HARDER CASING BUT STILL BRASS OR NICKEL PLATEING. TOTAL DIFFRENT GUN.PEOPLE AND GUNS ARE THE SAME. YOU HAVE TO FIND OUT WHAT THEY LIKE SO THEY WILL DO RIGHT. IF YOU DONT LIKE HUNTING. YOUR NOT GOING TO BE A GOOD HUNTER. MY WM DONT LIKE SOFT BRASS SO ITS NOT GONG TO SHOOT OR FUNCTION PROPERLY. SEMI-AUTO, LEVER OR BOLT. ITS WHAT IT LIKES TO SHOOT

  • Tom G.

    Yes I cleaned it according to the directions and it still jammed. Was surprised how filthy it was out of the box. I like the carbine feel Does anybody know if there is a big difference in accuracy at 350 yards between the 22" and carbine 18.5"?

    • Guest

      Shouldn't be that big of a difference. You loose about 8-10 FPS per inch of barrel in velocity with the carbine.

  • Tony R.

    bought my 750/ 308 used the guy I bought it from had to send it back to rem. they replaced the barrel and all the internal parts the gun now gropes 1/2 inch at 100 yards, I love mine!

  • Scott M.

    Bought a .243 synthetic. Have used a few different types of Hornady ammo with no problems. I have a Bushnell 6500 2.5-16 X 42 scope mounted on it as well as a vangard bipod, I have found it to be very accurate and reliable, in fact I would have to say it's one of my favorite guns.

  • Guest

    I have a 750 carmine in 35 Whelen and love it. If you have any issues with jams, 95% are all clip related. Take to a gun smith and he will know what to do. I shoot 200 grain Hornady Superformance and can shoot clover leaves at 100 yards. I started with Doubletap 250 Gr Spire and only got 1.5 – 2.0 inch groupings. I also have a 742 in 30-06 that I've had since 1972 and have shot 35-40 deer with it. The only jam I had with it ever, was a couple of years ago and it was due to a bad clip.

    • Guest

      It's a carbine…guess I should have spell checked better.

  • Barnaby2286

    What is the best ammunition to use with my Remington 750 30.06 for deer hunting?

  • Dennis

    New 750 in 308 carbine out of 4 boxes of various ammo Remington and Winchester
    managed to eject 5 when it does eject won’t pick up next round. New gun cleaned and oiled several times cycled more than a hundred times manually still doesn’t work. Looking at other reviews looks like time to take to local pawn shop, so far is a piece of crap

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